Guest Blogger: Andy Lattal Many applied behavior analysts find themselves in a different world from that in which they were trained. Most are trained by other behavior analysts in programs or even departments where the principal worldview is that of behavior analysis. Fast forward a couple of years (or more) and many of those same
Guest Blogger: Jackie Noto Effectively planning and leading meetings are beneficial for the success of employees and the company alike. Research has shown that productive meetings can have a significant return on investment for a company; however, few have received instruction on how best to plan or lead meetings. With the high levels of time

Measuring Thoughts

Guest Blogger: Andy Lattal “Neuroscientists Decode Brain Speech Signals into Written Text.” If you suspect that the National Enquirer wrote this recent newspaper headline, you would be wrong. It was published by the respected British newspaper, The Guardian. It caught my eye for obvious reasons. I have not checked out the science, but the report

Agency and Shaping

Guest Blogger: Andy Lattal Shaping, or the differential reinforcement of successive approximations, is thought by many to be the most important tool in the behavior analyst’s toolbox. Shaping is usually thought of as something one human does to change the behavior of another living organism, most often to a human but also to a pet
Performance problems plague organizations both big and small. Wherever humans work, performance is happening, and so too are problems. Though each company’s performance issues are unique, often a formulaic—read: cookie-cutter— approach is the chosen remedy. In other words, let’s train and retrain everybody.
Guest Blog by Andy Lattal, Ph.D.   I just googled the word “self”: 3,540,000,000 hits, more or less. That’s three point five billion, just to be clear. Wow. What a word. What a construct. Whoever came up with the idea of self? (In his recent book, Flesh in the Age of Reason, which I highly recommend,
Is approaching behavior change with a strategy of shame ever ethical under the BACB’s Professional and Ethical Compliance Code? Beyond those certified in clinical application, is shame a strategy that should be ever be used by a parent or professional as a method to change unwanted behavior?
Guest Blogger: Andy Lattal, Ph.D. Sitting here at my desk on a cold, snowy morning watching the snowflakes gently descend to blanket the landscape outside my window (such descriptions reveal why I am a behavior analyst and not a poet), reminds me of the operant (another reminder, too, of why I am not a poet). The
Guest Blogger: Cledia Caberlon Effective tools and interventions are the hallmarks of behavior analysis. Across disciplines and populations, applied behavior analysis improves people’s lives. While the science of human behavior can be implemented wherever behavior is found, according to Dr. Dean Fixsen, of the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute “Students do not benefit from

Staff Training That Clicks

Guest Blogger: Rachel Thomas Respondent Conditioning Auditory stimuli used for changing behavior dates back to the 1890s when physiologist Ivan Pavlov studied the effects of associating a bell tone with meat powder to elicit salivating in dogs. Though dogs are born with the reflex of drooling in the presence of stimuli that will satisfy their hunger, bells